Fix a typo in the README.
[movit] / README
1 <!-- Author's note; this was intended to become a home page at some point,
2      but I'm not interested enough in grokking HTML right now, so it became
3      the README instead. Most of it should be valid Markdown. -->
4
5 Announcing Movit
6 ================
7
8 Movit is the Modern Video Toolkit, notwithstanding that anything that's
9 called “modern” usually isn't, and it's really not a toolkit.
10
11 Movit aims to be a _high-quality_, _high-performance_, _open-source_
12 library for video filters. It is currently in alpha stage.
13
14
15 TL;DR, please give me download link and system demands
16 ======================================================
17
18 OK, you need
19
20 * A C++98 compiler. GCC will do. (I haven't tried Windows, but it
21   works fine on Linux and OS X, and Movit is not very POSIX-bound.)
22 * GNU Make.
23 * A GPU capable of running GLSL fragment shaders,
24   process floating-point textures, and a few other things. If your machine
25   is less than five years old _and you have the appropriate drivers_,
26   you're home free.
27 * The [Eigen 3] and [Google Test] libraries. (The library itself
28   depends only on the former, but you probably want to run the unit tests.)
29 * The [GLEW] library, for dealing with OpenGL extensions on various
30   platforms.
31
32 Movit has been tested with Intel GPUs with the Mesa drivers
33 (you'll probably need at least Mesa 8.0), Radeon 3850 and GeForce GTX 550
34 on Linux with the manufacturer's drivers, and with GeForce 8800 on OS X.
35 Again, most likely, GPU compatibility shouldn't be a big issue. See below
36 for performance estimates.
37
38
39 Still TL;DR, please give me the list of filters
40 ===============================================
41
42 Blur, diffusion, glow, lift/gamma/gain (color correction), mirror,
43 mix (add two inputs), overlay (the Porter-Duff “over” operation),
44 scale (bilinear and Lanczos), sharpen (both by unsharp mask and by
45 Wiener filters), saturation (or desaturation), vignette, and white balance.
46
47 Yes, that's a short list. But they all look great, are fast and don't give
48 you any nasty surprises. (I'd love to include denoise, deinterlace and
49 framerate up-/downconversion to the list, but doing them well are
50 all research-grade problems, and Movit is currently not there.)
51
52
53 TL;DR, but I am interested in a programming example instead
54 ===========================================================
55
56 Assuming you have an OpenGL context already set up:
57
58 <code>
59   EffectChain chain(1280, 720);
60
61   ImageFormat inout_format;
62   inout_format.color_space = COLORSPACE_sRGB;
63   inout_format.gamma_curve = GAMMA_sRGB;
64   FlatInput *input = new FlatInput(inout_format, FORMAT_BGRA_POSTMULTIPLIED_ALPHA, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, 1280, 720));
65   chain.add_input(input);
66
67   Effect *saturation_effect = chain.add_effect(new SaturationEffect());
68   saturation_effect->set_float("saturation", 0.7f);
69
70   Effect *lift_gamma_gain_effect = chain.add_effect(new LiftGammaGainEffect());
71   const float gain[] = { 0.8f, 1.0f, 1.0f };
72   lift_gamma_gain_effect->set_vec3("gain", &gain);
73
74   chain.add_output(inout_format, OUTPUT_POSTMULTIPLIED_ALPHA);
75   chain.finalize();
76
77   for ( ;; ) {
78     // Do whatever you need here to decode the next frame into <pixels>.
79     input->set_pixel_data(pixels);
80     chain.render_to_screen();
81   }
82 </code>
83
84
85 OK, I can read a bit. What do you mean by “modern”?
86 ===================================================
87
88 Backwards compatibility is fine and all, but sometimes we can do better
89 by observing that the world has moved on. In particular:
90
91 * It's 2012, so people want to edit HD video.
92 * It's 2012, so everybody has a GPU.
93 * It's 2012, so everybody has a working C++ compiler.
94   (Even Microsoft fixed theirs around 2003!)
95
96 While from a programming standpoint I'd love to say that it's 2012
97 and interlacing does no longer exist, but that's not true (and interlacing,
98 hated as it might be, is actually a useful and underrated technique for
99 bandwidth reduction in broadcast video). Movit will eventually provide
100 limited support for working with interlaced video, but currently does not.
101
102
103 What do you mean by “high-performance”?
104 =======================================
105
106 Today, you can hardly get a _cellphone_ without a multi-core, SIMD-capable
107 CPU, and a GPU. Yet, almost all open-source pixel processing I've seen
108 is written using straight-up single-threaded, scalar C! Clearly there is
109 room for improvement here, and that improvement is sorely needed.
110 We want to edit 1080p video, not watch slideshows.
111
112 Movit has chosen to run all pixel processing on the GPU, using GLSL—OpenCL is
113 way too young, and CUDA is single-vendor (and also surprisingly hard to
114 get good performance from for anything nontrivial). While “run on the GPU”
115 does not equal “infinite speed” (I am fairly certain that for many common
116 filters, I can beat the Intel-based GPU in my laptop with multithreaded SSE
117 code on the CPU—especially as moving the data to and from the GPU has a cost that is not
118 to be taken lightly), GPU programming is probably the _simplest_ way of writing
119 highly parallel code, and it also frees the CPU to do other things like video
120 decoding.
121
122 Exactly what speeds you can expect is of course highly dependent on
123 your GPU and the exact filter chain you are running. As a rule of thumb,
124 you can run a reasonable filter chain (a lift/gamma/gain operation,
125 a bit of diffusion, maybe a vignette) at 720p in around 30 fps on a two-year-old
126 Intel laptop. If you have a somewhat newer Intel card, you can do 1080p
127 video without much problems. And on a mid-range nVidia card of today
128 (GTX 550 Ti), you can probably process 4K movies directly.
129
130
131 What do you mean by “high-quality”?
132 ===================================
133
134 Movit aims to be high-quality in two important aspects, namely _code quality_
135 and _output quality_. (Unfortunately, documentation quality is not on the
136 list yet. Sorry.)
137
138
139 High-quality output?
140 ====================
141
142 Movit works internally in linear floating-point all the way, strongly
143 reducing interim round-off and clipping errors. Furthermore, Movit is
144 (weakly) colorspace-aware. Why do colorspaces matter? Well, here's a video frame from a typical
145 camera, which records in Rec. 709 (the typical HDTV color space), and here's the 
146 same frame misinterpreted as Rec. 601 (the typical SDTV color space):
147
148 [insert picture here]
149
150 The difference might be subtle, but would you like that color cast?
151 Maybe you could correct for it manually, but what if it happened on output
152 instead of on input? And I can promise you that once we move to more
153 wide-gamut color spaces, like the one in Rec. 2020 (used for UHDTV), the
154 difference will be anything but subtle. As of [why working in linear
155 light matters](http://www.4p8.com/eric.brasseur/gamma.html),
156 others have explained it better than I can; note also
157 that this makes Movit future-proof when the world moves towards 10-
158 and 12-bit color precision. The extra power from the GPU makes all of this
159 simple, so do we not need to make too many concessions for the sake of speed.
160
161 Movit does not currently do ICC profiles or advanced gamut mapping;
162 if you have out-of-gamut colors, they will clip. Sorry.
163
164
165 OK, and high-quality code?
166 ==========================
167
168 Image processing code can be surprisingly subtle; it's easy to write
169 code that looks right, but that makes subtle artifacts that explode
170 when processed further in a later step. (Or code that simply never
171 worked, just that nobody cared to look at the output when a given
172 parameter was set. I've seen that, too.)
173
174 Movit tries to counteract this by three different strategies:
175
176 * First, _look at the output_. Does it look good? Really?
177   Even if you zoom in on the results? Don't settle for “meh, I'm 
178   sure that's the best it can get”.
179 * Second, _keep things simple_. Movit does not aim for including
180   every possible video effect under the sun (there are [others out there]
181   that want that); the [YAGNI] principle is applied quite strongly throughout
182   the code. It's much better to write less code but actually
183   understand what it does; whenever I can replace some magic matrix
184   or obscure formula from the web with a clean calculation and a descriptive
185   comment on top, it makes me a bit happier. (Most of the time,
186   it turns out that I had used the matrix or formula in a wrong
187   way anyway. My degree is in multimedia signal processing, but it
188   does not mean I have a deep understanding of everything people do
189   in graphics.)
190 * Third, _have unit tests_. Tests are boring, but they are unforgiving
191   (much more unforgiving than your eye), and they keep stuff from breaking
192   afterwards. Almost every single test I wrote has uncovered bugs in Movit,
193   so they have already paid for themselves.
194
195 There is, of course, always room for improvement. I'm sure you can find
196 things that are stupid, little-thought-out, or buggy. If so, please let me
197 know.
198
199
200 What do you mean by “open-source”?
201 ==================================
202
203 Movit is licensed under the [GNU GPL](http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html),
204 either version 2 or (at your option) any later version.