Release Movit 1.3.2. (From a branch, since I do not want to break ABI compatibility...
[movit] / README
diff --git a/README b/README
index 62c99d0..8e47db7 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -93,15 +93,15 @@ OK, I can read a bit. What do you mean by “modern”?
 Backwards compatibility is fine and all, but sometimes we can do better
 by observing that the world has moved on. In particular:
 
-* It's 2015, so people want to edit HD video.
-* It's 2015, so everybody has a GPU.
-* It's 2015, so everybody has a working C++ compiler.
+* It's 2016, so people want to edit HD video.
+* It's 2016, so everybody has a GPU.
+* It's 2016, so everybody has a working C++ compiler.
   (Even Microsoft fixed theirs around 2003!)
 
-While from a programming standpoint I'd love to say that it's 2015
+While from a programming standpoint I'd love to say that it's 2016
 and interlacing does no longer exist, but that's not true (and interlacing,
 hated as it might be, is actually a useful and underrated technique for
-bandwidth reduction in broadcast video). Movit will eventually provide
+bandwidth reduction in broadcast video). Movit may eventually provide
 limited support for working with interlaced video; it has a deinterlacer,
 but cannot currently process video in interlaced form.
 
@@ -128,9 +128,9 @@ decoding.
 Exactly what speeds you can expect is of course highly dependent on
 your GPU and the exact filter chain you are running. As a rule of thumb,
 you can run a reasonable filter chain (a lift/gamma/gain operation,
-a bit of diffusion, maybe a vignette) at 720p in around 30 fps on a two-year-old
+a bit of diffusion, maybe a vignette) at 720p in around 30 fps on a four-year-old
 Intel laptop. If you have a somewhat newer Intel card, you can do 1080p
-video without much problems. And on a mid-range nVidia card of today
+video without much problems. And on a low-range nVidia card of today
 (GTX 550 Ti), you can probably process 4K movies directly.