Movit can hardly be said to be in alpha stage anymore.
[movit] / README
diff --git a/README b/README
index dd51022..e738f7f 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Movit is the Modern Video Toolkit, notwithstanding that anything that's
 called “modern” usually isn't, and it's really not a toolkit.
 
 Movit aims to be a _high-quality_, _high-performance_, _open-source_
-library for video filters. It is currently in alpha stage.
+library for video filters.
 
 
 TL;DR, please give me download link and system demands
@@ -39,10 +39,11 @@ for performance estimates.
 Still TL;DR, please give me the list of filters
 ===============================================
 
-Blur, diffusion, glow, lift/gamma/gain (color correction), mirror,
-mix (add two inputs), overlay (the Porter-Duff “over” operation),
-scale (bilinear and Lanczos), sharpen (both by unsharp mask and by
-Wiener filters), saturation (or desaturation), vignette, and white balance.
+Blur, diffusion, FFT-based convolution, glow, lift/gamma/gain (color
+correction), mirror, mix (add two inputs), luma mix (use a map to wipe between
+two inputs), overlay (the Porter-Duff “over” operation), scale (bilinear and
+Lanczos), sharpen (both by unsharp mask and by Wiener filters), saturation
+(or desaturation), vignette, and white balance.
 
 Yes, that's a short list. But they all look great, are fast and don't give
 you any nasty surprises. (I'd love to include denoise, deinterlace and
@@ -56,6 +57,7 @@ TL;DR, but I am interested in a programming example instead
 Assuming you have an OpenGL context already set up:
 
 <code>
+  using namespace movit;
   EffectChain chain(1280, 720);
 
   ImageFormat inout_format;
@@ -71,7 +73,7 @@ Assuming you have an OpenGL context already set up:
   const float gain[] = { 0.8f, 1.0f, 1.0f };
   lift_gamma_gain_effect->set_vec3("gain", &gain);
 
-  chain.add_output(inout_format, OUTPUT_POSTMULTIPLIED_ALPHA);
+  chain.add_output(inout_format, OUTPUT_ALPHA_FORMAT_POSTMULTIPLIED);
   chain.finalize();
 
   for ( ;; ) {
@@ -88,12 +90,12 @@ OK, I can read a bit. What do you mean by “modern”?
 Backwards compatibility is fine and all, but sometimes we can do better
 by observing that the world has moved on. In particular:
 
-* It's 2012, so people want to edit HD video.
-* It's 2012, so everybody has a GPU.
-* It's 2012, so everybody has a working C++ compiler.
+* It's 2014, so people want to edit HD video.
+* It's 2014, so everybody has a GPU.
+* It's 2014, so everybody has a working C++ compiler.
   (Even Microsoft fixed theirs around 2003!)
 
-While from a programming standpoint I'd love to say that it's 2012
+While from a programming standpoint I'd love to say that it's 2014
 and interlacing does no longer exist, but that's not true (and interlacing,
 hated as it might be, is actually a useful and underrated technique for
 bandwidth reduction in broadcast video). Movit will eventually provide
@@ -153,9 +155,10 @@ instead of on input? And I can promise you that once we move to more
 wide-gamut color spaces, like the one in Rec. 2020 (used for UHDTV), the
 difference will be anything but subtle. As of [why working in linear
 light matters](http://www.4p8.com/eric.brasseur/gamma.html),
-others have explained it better than I can; note also
-that this makes Movit future-proof when the world moves towards 10-
-and 12-bit color precision. The extra power from the GPU makes all of this
+others have explained it better than I can; note also that this makes Movit
+future-proof when the world moves towards 10- and 12-bit color precision
+(although the latter requires Movit to change from 16-bit to 32-bit floating
+point, it is a simple switch). The extra power from the GPU makes all of this
 simple, so do we not need to make too many concessions for the sake of speed.
 
 Movit does not currently do ICC profiles or advanced gamut mapping;